Memoirs of the Addams Administration 30.

“The great thing about hitting yourself in the head with a hammer is that it feels so good when you stop.”  Recently, almost two-thirds (64 percent) of Americans desired the preservation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) as it currently exists or with reforms of “problem areas.”[1]   Are there “problem areas”?  Yes.  Here are a couple of examples.  First, there are many people who are caught in a tight spot by earning too much to qualify for subsidies, but too little to be able to afford health insurance.  Second, only a few insurance companies had any experience at providing/pricing health insurance to poor people.  The Obama administration lured many other health insurers into participating in the healthcare market places by promising that all sorts of healthy rubes would pay premiums without needing much care.  Then, the Obama administration failed to enforce the “mandate.”  Many people did not even bother to get health insurance.[2]  The lack of young, healthy fools ready to be gouged for the benefit of older, wealthier people lies at the root of the instability in healthcare market places.  Third, the survival of the system depends upon continuing subsidies from appropriations passed by Congress.  The Republicans have declined to pass such appropriations and a federal court has held that spending without an appropriation is unconstitutional.  This case has not yet been heard by the Supreme Court.  When the Court does hear the case, it seems likely to support the initial decision.

Then, there are all the bad-press issues.  President Barack Obama said that “If you like your insurance, you can keep it” (or words to that effect).  Then the government cancelled a lot of insurance policies as “garbage policies” when the policy-holders really liked those policies.  The “roll-out” of the healthcare.gov web-site was a humiliating mess.  The Supreme Court held that the extension of Medicaid could not be forced on states that didn’t wish to participate by the threat to withhold other Medicaid funding.[3]  Naturally, these colossal screw-ups colored the perception of the ACA for a time.  Now, however, with the ACA an established—if imperfect—reality,[4] Republicans might do well to concentrate on remediation.

Such remediation might consist of getting rid of the ACA mandate on what must be covered; getting rid of the “mandate” that everyone must be covered; allowing/encouraging a few experienced companies to provide insurance for previously uninsured Americans[5]; expanding the range of those people eligible for subsidies; appropriating the moneys needed to make the system work; and not trying to coerce states that don’t want to expand Medicaid.

This will not be easy for Republican law-makers to do.  It abandons ideas of personal responsibility, to which many Republican voters are committed.  It expands spending, when we are already neck-deep in red-ink.  On the other hand, it will not be easy for Democrat law-makers to do.  It abandons the idea of “equal access” to health care and it abandons another federal suppression of state autonomy.

Then we can argue about how to close the budget deficit.  Anthoer difficult task.

[1] “Poll Watch,” The Week, 11 August 2017, p. 17.

[2] About 15 million people did get health insurance solely out of fear of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS).  These 15 million resent having to buy something they don’t need and constitute the core of those people who would “lose” this insurance under various Republican plans.

[3] This class-based program of medical insurance covers many Trump voters as well as the voters whom the Trump voters despise for other reasons.

[4] Like Social Security, Medicare, and the Espionage Act of 1918.

[5] Yes, I understand that this will create a two-tier medical care system.  “What are you, fresh offa da boat?  Expect that the streets are paved with gold?  ‘Merica is hard place to live.  Still, is better than the Old Country. “  NB: Imagined monologue, not a quote from the text.

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